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Astronomy

The Cassini Google Doodle

What I like about Google in the Morning (other than the smell of victory, of course), is: The company is run by geeks and nderds and therefor, they care a lot about science. This morning, when I browsed to Google, I found this wonderfull Doodle and it made me grin: …

Tatooine might be out there!

The good news on Star Wars in the real world does not cease. After one of the Mars rovers clearly spotted the Mos Eisley Cantina Band, it now also seems like a planet like Tatooine might actually exist. Tatooine famously orbits a binary star (see header image) and it was …

Non-Euclidean Æthercast #43 – A chat with planetary scientist Jo Lima

http://media.blubrry.com/non_euclidean_aethercast/p/s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/aethercast/aethercast/NonEuclidean43.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 47:07 — 43.1MB) | EmbedIn today’s episode of the Non-Euclidean Æthercast I have the great pleasure of chatting with one of my oldest international contacts in the Steampunk scene: Jo Lima from Portugal. Since we have known each other for quite a …

Sleep well, Rosetta, you made us proud!

Rosetta, ESA’s 12 year mission to study comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko has come to an end with an epic finale. The Rosetta probe has crash-landed on the comet and thus joined the lander Philae, it successfully deployed there on November 12th 2014. One of the most ambitious space missions in human history …

Minutes at the Edge #11 – Sagittarius B2, the biggest bar in the Milky Way

http://media.blubrry.com/non_euclidean_aethercast/p/s3.amazonaws.com/ScienceEdge/Edge11.mp3Podcast (minutesedge): Play in new window | Download (Duration: 5:37 — 5.1MB) | EmbedIt has been too long, but now Minutes at the Edge is back and I offer some wild speculations concerning Fermi’s Paradox and how Sagittarius B2 could be a possible solution to it. This is mainly because …

With EdX on the way to an Astronomy Degree #win

A long, long time ago, I wanted to be a scientist, an astronomer to be precise. I started dabbling in astronomy in my early teens and have been interested in the stars basically since I first saw the night sky. For various reasons (mainly the prospect of finding steady work …